A literary elements of chaucers the wife of the baths tale

The Wife of Bath begins her lengthy prologue by announcing that she has always followed the rule of experience rather than authority. Having already had five husbands "at the church door," she has experience enough to make her an expert.

A literary elements of chaucers the wife of the baths tale

Now, those creatures are gone because their spots have been taken by the friars and other mendicants that seem to fill every nook and cranny of the isle. And though the friars rape women, just as the incubi did in the days of the fairies, the friars only cause women dishonor—the incubi always got them pregnant.

Overcome by lust and his sense of his own power, he rapes her. The court is scandalized by the crime and decrees that the knight should be put to death by decapitation.

Arthur, wisely obedient to wifely counsel, grants their request. The queen presents the knight with the following challenge: The knight sets forth in sorrow.

He roams throughout the country, posing the question to every woman he meets. Some claim that women love money best, some honor, some jolliness, some looks, some sex, some remarriage, some flattery, and some say that women most want to be free to do as they wish.

Finally, says the Wife, some say that women most want to be considered discreet and secretive, although she argues that such an answer is clearly untrue, since no woman can keep a secret. The Wife then says that if her listeners would like to hear how the tale ends, they should read Ovid.

She returns to her story of the knight. When his day of judgment draws near, the knight sorrowfully heads for home. As he rides near a forest, he sees a large group of women dancing and decides to approach them to ask his question.

But as he approaches, the group vanishes, and all he can see is an ugly old woman. The woman asks if she can be of help, and the knight explains his predicament and promises to reward her if she can help him. The woman tells the knight that he must pledge himself to her in return for her help, and the knight, having no options left, gladly consents.

She then guarantees that his life will be saved. The knight and the old woman travel together to the court, where, in front of a large audience, the knight tells the queen the answer with which the old woman supplied him: The old hag comes forth and publicly asks the knight to marry her.

The knight cries out in horror. He begs her to take his material possessions rather than his body, but she refuses to yield, and in the end he is forced to consent. The two are married in a small, private wedding and go to bed together the same night.

A literary elements of chaucers the wife of the baths tale

Throughout the entire ordeal, the knight remains miserable. While in bed, the loathsome hag asks the knight why he is so sad. He replies that he could hardly bear the shame of having such an ugly, lowborn wife. There have been sons of noble fathers, she argues, who were shameful and villainous, though they shared the same blood.

Her family may be poor, but real poverty lies in covetousness, and real riches lie in having little and wanting nothing. She offers the knight a choice: The knight ponders in silence.

A literary elements of chaucers the wife of the baths tale

Finally, he replies that he would rather trust her judgment, and he asks her to choose whatever she thinks best. The two have a long, happy marriage, and the woman becomes completely obedient to her husband.

The Wife of Bath concludes with a plea that Jesus Christ send all women husbands who are young, meek, and fresh in bed, and the grace to outlive their husbands.A summary of Themes in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Interpretive issues and general research sources: The "Wife of Bath's Prologue" is a work of literature so compellingly realistic that many students believe she is real, that the "Wife" is the author rather than Geoffrey Chaucer.

The Wife of Bath's Tale (Middle English: the Tale of the Wyf of Bathe) is among the best-known of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

Chaucer's Wife of Bath. Perhaps the best-known pilgrim in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is Alisoun, the Wife of Bath. The Wife's fame derives from Chaucer's deft characterization of her as a brassy, bawdy woman—the very antithesis of virtuous womanhood—who .

Chaucer's Wife of Bath. Perhaps the best-known pilgrim in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is Alisoun, the Wife of Bath. The Wife's fame derives from Chaucer's deft characterization of her as a brassy, bawdy woman—the very antithesis of virtuous womanhood—who . · Fifty Shades and a literary elements of chaucers the wife of the baths tale Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Tale have a literary elements of chaucers the wife of the baths tale a even if he did not add these new elements 13 Reasons Why follows a long literary. A summary of Themes in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means. The Wife of Bath's Tale; The Pardoner's Introduction, Prologue, and Tale; The Nun's Priest's Prologue, Tale, and Epilogue Themes are the fundamental and often .

Transcript of The Wife of Bath (Prologue & Tale) Geoffrey Chaucer By Kristy Ryan, Katelyn Wilson, & Rachel Chace literary elements Summary Summary Analysis Cont. . Free essay on Literary Elements of Chaucer's "The Wife of Bath’s Tale available totally free at iridis-photo-restoration.com, the largest free essay community.

SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath’s Tale